Lindsay’s Darrell Segura uses ice pop sticks and toothpicks to create miniature scenes

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By Patrick Dillon @PDillon_SGN

LINDSAY – Give Darrell Segura some ice pop sticks and glue; sit back and watch what he can create. From a blank slate those two items and other small

This Old West scene including a water tower, windmill and restaurant is just one of many created by Darrell Segura out of extra toothpicks and ice pop sticks at the Lindsay Senior Center each week. Photo by Patrick Dillon.

This Old West scene including a water tower, windmill and restaurant is just one of many created by Darrell Segura out of extra toothpicks and ice pop sticks at the Lindsay Senior Center each week. Photo by Patrick Dillon.

pieces of wood are masterly put together to create miniature real-life scenes.

“If I didn’t start doing this I don’t know what I’d be doing. Probably eating a lot more,” said Segura.

About three years ago was when Segura began frequenting the Lindsay Senior Center. At first it was just a place for the retiree to be during the day. Segura would sit with his cup of coffee and visit with other senior citizens. He quickly began to realize he was one of the few regulars at the senior center who didn’t have a craft of his own.

While, Segura was not overly enthusiastic about knitting, popular among many seniors there, he did try his hand at painting, which was something he remembered from his childhood.

From there he began to find other ways of expressing his artistic side. Eventually Segura found an artform that was intricate, constructive and interesting.

He started using old picture frames and put tooth picks on them as a design and presenting them as gifts to others seniors. After realizing there was also an abundance of ice pop sticks and other loose pieces of small wood, Segura got the idea to begin creating water towers, windmills and other buildings. Then he started matching the scale and combining them to make scenes out of the Old West.

“I never did this sort of thing when I was younger,” said Segura. “I use to always see other people do it but thought, ‘there is no way that I could ever do that.’”

Segura says that he has no blueprint when he starts a new display. Instead he likes the freedom of being able to add or change whatever he wants.

“I like to make it as real as it can be,” said Segura. “So that when you see it you can visualize a place in your mind.”

That drive to make these sceneries as real as possible comes from Segura’s attention to detail. Every single piece that he uses in his displays has a purpose.

Even pencil shavings can be used as the leaves of a tree on a current church scene display.

The hope is, like his picture frames, other people can not only enjoy the visuals of these displays but also transport themselves to a place in their imagination. Segura plans on donating everything that he creates to the center so they can auction them off in order to raise some addition funds. For more information about Segura or the Lindsay Senior Center, call 559-562-5859.

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